Video

Why Torosaurus is not a Triceratops

May 02, 2012 | Author: AAAS MemberCentral Project Director and Managing Editor Peggy Mihelich

A life-sized bronze statue of Torosaurus latus, a frilled dinosaur, that lived during the late Cretaceous period (between 70 and 65 million years ago), stands atop a large stone base outside the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, in New Haven, Connecticut. The replica of the plant-eating dinosaur, known for its large round openings in the frill, looks out onto Whitney Avenue, while unassuming pedestrians pass underneath it.

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