Videos

  • March 12, 2014

    As a professor and chair at University of Pittsburgh, senior researcher of rehabilitative science, and pioneer of the Experiential Learning for Veterans in Assistive Technology and Engineering program, Rory Cooper has taken an active role in advancing the technology that can help people with disabilities live a normal life. Cooper, an Army vet, was confined to a wheelchair after a noncombat accident in 1980, and he knows first hand the challenges faced by those with disabilities. We want to do the same things that everyone else does, and technology can make that happen, Cooper told the nearly 1,000 participants, including approximately 650 undergraduate and graduate students in science, technology, math or engineering (STEM), who attended the Emerging Researchers National (ERN) Conference in STEM, held Feb. 22-23 in Washington D.C. Watch his keynote address and then check out the other notable speakers from this conference»

  • March 12, 2014

    Each keynote speaker at the Emerging Researchers National (ERN) Conference in STEM, held Feb. 22-23 in Washington, D.C., had a different story to tell of how they got where they are today. They had one trait in common, however. All of them faced doubts, fears and stereotypes along the way but didn't allow those feelings to stop them from achieving their goals, to work in science and to become leaders in their fields. The ERN conference, now in its fourth year, seeks to help underrepresented minorities and persons with disabilities at the undergraduate and graduate level, enhance their science communications skills and better understand how to prepare for science careers in a global workforce. The conference was co-hosted by AAAS and the National Science Foundation. »

  • March 12, 2014

    If you've ever dreamed of sitting on the board of directors of a nonprofit and corporate organization, than you better heed the advice of Georgia State Professor and Former Dean Sidney E. Harris. Harris has built a career on information technology and business strategy that has propelled him to the top of the business world. Harris didn't start out as a titan of business, he grew up poor, had a speech impediment and at times suffered from self-doubt. In time, with help from mentors and support from loved ones, he overcame those challenges. Harris shared his story of success with the nearly 1,000 participants, including approximately 650 undergraduate and graduate students in science, technology, math or engineering (STEM), who attended the Emerging Researchers National (ERN) Conference in STEM, held Feb. 22-23 in Washington D.C. Watch his keynote address and then check out the other notable speakers from this conference»

  • March 12, 2014

    Paula Hammond is a David H. Koch Professor in Engineering, at the Department of Chemical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Hammond's research focuses on three major areas: creating polymers for revolutionary drug-delivery systems, energy and fuel cells, and the Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies. Her lab builds very thin films that can for example, degrade and release a drug, or contain carbon nanotubes that allow her team to generate an electrochemical device. She shared her story with the nearly 1,000 participants, including approximately 650 undergraduate and graduate students in science, technology, math or engineering (STEM), who attended the Emerging Researchers National (ERN) Conference in STEM, held Feb. 22-23 in Washington D.C. Watch her keynote address and then check out the other notable speakers from this conference»

  • March 12, 2014

    The organizers of the Emerging Researchers National (ERN) Conference in STEM, held Feb. 22-23 in Washington D.C., hosted a panel discussion on faculty and student international collaborations in STEM. Members of the six-person panel spoke about their experiences working overseas on research. Each faculty member and student discussed what it was like to collaborate with others and the challenges they faced during their time abroad. »

  • March 12, 2014

    As Chief Scientific Officer at CytonomeST Lydia Villa-Komaroff is developing an optical cell sorter that supports rapid, sterile selection of human cells, which will enable the development of new cell therapies. Villa-Komaroff spent more than 20 years studying genes, mainly concentrating on protein synthesis, cell development, and growth mutations. She gained international recognition in 1978 as one of the pioneers in the emerging field of cloning. At the time of her groundbreaking research on cloning, Villa-Komaroff was one of only a handful of female Mexican-American molecular biologists. She shared her story with the nearly 1,000 participants, including approximately 650 undergraduate and graduate students in science, technology, math or engineering (STEM), who attended the Emerging Researchers National (ERN) Conference in STEM, held Feb. 22-23 in Washington D.C. Watch her keynote address and then check out the other notable speakers from this conference»

  • December 30, 2013

    Thirty-nine missions to space over the course of nearly 30 years, the space shuttle Discovery far exceeded NASA's goals of helping expand our knowledge and exploration of space. Discovery was retired from service on March 9, 2011 and now is on public view at the National Air and Space Museum's Steven F. »

  • December 16, 2013

    The Dialogue on Science, Ethics, and Religion (DoSER) Program at the American Association for the Advancement of Science recently hosted "Conversations: Science, Scientists, and the Human Spirit," a holiday lecture featuring broadcast journalist and author Krista Tippett.

    Tippett is the Peabody Award-winning host of “On Being,” a public radio show heard on nearly 300 stations. She is also the author of two books, Einstein’s God: Conversations About Science and the Human Spirit and Speaking of Faith: Why Religion Matters and How to Talk About It»

  • November 26, 2013

    Brian Litt, M.D., professor of neurology and bioengineering at the Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania gave lawmakers attending a AAAS lecture near Capitol Hill a crash course in how neurotechnologies are increasingly being used to understand human disease and, in turn, improve patient communication and function.  »

  • October 16, 2013

    Legislative Director and Senior Counsel Rachel Weintraub of the Consumer Federation of America said that "under the government shutdown, many of the consumer protections we depend upon have been significantly curtailed." Weintraub was asked to give testimony on the impacts of the government shutdown to consumer safety to a the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation which called the hearing on October 11. Weintraub was part of a panel of experts that included AAAS CEO Alan I. Leshner.  »