A community college antidote to African American male underachievement A community college antidote to African American male underachievement Driving Force December 2, 2014 The headline caught my eye: Are African American women overachieving in engineering? Some persuasive undergraduate-degree data cited in the article support the contention, but send a dangerous message. The danger is that something so positive suggests that no problem exists. It can breed complacency by those for whom diversity is but one of several “priorities.” The real problem may be that it diverts attention from the critical issue that African American men are underachieving in science. Indeed, they represent two of every five African Americans attending college and only one of every three completing an engineering degree. Women’s participation in engineering is so striking, countering other minority trends, that we should celebrate. But universities must emulate the lead of employers, redoubling their efforts to enroll and graduate students of color in all STEM disciplines. A tribute to AAAS Fellow Joseph F. Coates The science of looking ahead: A tribute to AAAS Fellow Joseph F. Coates Tuesday, November 4, 2014 Some people just see farther. For a “consulting futurist,” foresight would seem to be mandatory. For AAAS Fellow Joseph F. Coates, who died October 16 at age 85, the scientific study of what’s beyond the visible horizon yielded a career that combined brilliance, effrontery and a legion of devotees.   Exploring Careers at the Intersection of Science, Law & Business Podcast January 00, 1970 Do you have strong analytical skills and an understanding of complex technologies and their applications? Are you interested in a career that doesn’t limit you to working in a research lab? Then this webinar is for you! Study shows sexual harassment and assault rampant in field science Driving Force October 28, 2014 A recent study reports that scientists frequently experience sexual harassment and assault while conducting fieldwork. This study raises important questions about how to best promote safe fieldwork experiences for scientists—particularly trainees. The diversity disconnect in Silicon Valley Driving Force October 16, 2014 The saga of “Silicon Valley ‘gets religion’ on diversifying the tech workforce” continues to be jolted by stories in USA Today and other commentary, including that in this column. The latest discussion in USA Today of hiring practices by companies like Apple, eBay, Facebook, Google, LinkedIn, Twitter, and Yahoo discloses yet another facet of workforce composition. Why do elite life science labs run by men have fewer female trainees? Driving Force September 29, 2014 Women now earn more than half the Ph.D.s awarded in the life sciences but hold only 18 percent of full professorships in these fields. A recent study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that one potential cause for this disparity is that female graduate students and postdocs are underrepresented in top labs. This underrepresentation is problematic, as top labs are the primary feeders to faculty positions. Transitioning from Lab to Management Podcast January 00, 1970 Working in a lab can be one of the most fulfilling opportunities for researchers. But are you ready for a new challenge? Then consider a role in project management or university administration and develop your skills in fulfilling new directions. Watch this webinar and get an exclusive look at how to make a successful career transition from the lab to management. Creating a culture of safety in the lab Creating a culture of safety in the lab Driving Force August 15, 2014 In recent months we’ve learned that samples of living smallpox virus were abandoned in a National Institutes of Health (NIH) storage room, that dozens of employees at the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) were potentially exposed to a poorly handled shipment of anthrax, that a CDC lab accidentally contaminated a flu sample with the deadly H5N1 bird flu strain, and that a chemistry professor was fined $10,000 (and 800 hours of community service) for failing to properly supervise a research assistant who died in his lab. Members of the public may have been horrified about these cases, but academic scientists were likely less surprised. This is because many labs have an “insufficient culture of safety,” according to CDC Director Thomas Frieden. How can labs better foster a culture of safety? Tech diversity:  Where analysis meets advocacy Tech diversity: Where analysis meets advocacy Driving Force August 18, 2014 The reports from Silicon Valley—eBay this time—of a workforce in which blacks and Hispanics are grossly underrepresented continues to tell a story of how the tech industry has evolved a workforce that sure doesn’t look like America. Affirmative action: Class, race, place and the future of STEM Driving Force August 5, 2014 Time to take stock. Since the Fifth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the use of race in college admissions in Fisher v. University of Texas, what are the prospects that race-conscious affirmative action will prevail in higher education?