Neuroscientists have a nested data problem (and they're not alone) Driving Force May 1, 2014 Neuroscientists have an ever-increasing array of high-tech techniques at their disposal. These tools allow researchers to make increasingly detailed measurements from individual neurons, and even components, of individual neurons. Unfortunately, they also have led to a statistical problem: the improper analysis of nested data. According to a recent report, 53 percent of molecular, cellular and developmental neuroscience papers published in five prominent journals contained nested data that call into question the true strength of these papers’ findings. Big data and effective urbanization 2014 Annual Meeting: Big data and effective urbanization Sunday, February 16, 2014 “For the first time in history, more than half of the world's population lives in urban areas,” notes Steven Koonin, director of the Center for Urban Science and Progress at New York University. Koonin was one of the speakers at the seminar titled, "A New Era for Urban Research: Open Data and Big Computation," Saturday, Feb. 15 at the 2014 AAAS Annual Meeting. Your chance to be featured in Science Tuesday, January 7, 2014 Answer this question: If you had 5 extra hours per week to devote to advocacy for science, how would you use that time? at http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/NextGen10mc Make sure to enter by the 14th February.  A selection of the best responses will be published in the April 4th issue of Science. See results from the last survey at http://scim.ag/NextGen9Results Council elects 388 new AAAS Fellows Council elects 388 new AAAS Fellows Monday, November 25, 2013 The AAAS Council has elected 388 members as Fellows of AAAS for the year 2013. These individuals will be recognized for their contributions to science and technology during the 2014 AAAS Annual Meeting in Chicago, which will take place February 13 to 17. Learn more about this exciting new class on AAAS's website. On sexism, bobbleheads dolls, and female scientists On sexism, bobblehead dolls, and female scientists Driving Force December 12, 2013 In the past several weeks, there have been many discussions—on Twitter, on blogs, and even in the mainstream press—about what it’s like to be a female scientist. Here I highlight just a few of the issues covered in these discussions (but provide plenty of links so you can learn more).  U.S. government recruits researchers to further anti-smoking efforts U.S. government recruits researchers to further anti-smoking efforts Capitol Connection October 23, 2013 The U.S. government has taken a more active role in curbing smoking, with positive results for the public and for researchers. The first federally funded anti-smoking campaign kicked off in March 2012, and now a recent study details its successes. Further, the FDA and NIH together have awarded $53 million to fund 14 Tobacco Centers of Regulatory Science (TCORS) proposals that will research the risks of tobacco use and develop science-based methods that inform how tobacco products are regulated and marketed. Political science budget cut from NSF, Political Scientists speak up Political science budget cut from NSF, scientists speak up Capitol Connection August 26, 2013 The National Science Foundation (NSF) has cancelled funding to the Political Science Program for the fall cycle. This was caused by an amendment stating that federal funding should be given to research that qualifies for one of two conditions: that it either be vital to national security or be used for economic growth within the United States. VIDEO: Stephen Freeland and the search for life on other planets Video August 02, 2013 The AAAS Dialogue on Science, Ethics and Religion (DOSER) program hosted an event in June 2013 about the discovery of exoplanets and the possibility of life beyond Earth. During the event, panelists discussed what discovering life outside our Earth would mean for religions and humanity. They examined how the discovery of exoplanets is already influencing our views of the universe. VIDEO: Violence, stress and childhood development with Felton Earls Video July 16, 2013 Early exposure to violence can have a striking impact on a child's mental, social and psychological development. This kind of exposure can change lifelong brain function and overall health throughout life. In this video for lawmakers on Capitol Hill, Felton Earls, a professor of social medicine, emeritus, Harvard Medical School; research professor of human behavior and development, Harvard School of Public Health, discusses a large-scale epidemiological project in Chicago that examines the causes and consequences of children’s exposure to community and family violence. VIDEO: Science revealed through art Video June 27, 2013 Visual artists who aim to help us better understand ourselves and our world, express their understanding by means of paintings, sculpture and other media. When inspired by the world revealed by contemporary science, such works of art are capable of powerfully influencing how the public visualizes and responds to the world described by science, according to Alexandra Hart, a metals artist/designer goldsmith who spoke at the AAAS Pacific Division Annual Meeting in Las Vegas.