FDA considers allowing embryos with three genetic parents Capitol Connection March 27, 2014 Each year, around 4,000 babies are born with inherited mitochondrial diseases in the United States. Problems can include blindness, epilepsy, movement disorders, liver failure, necrotizing brain lesions, and other serious maladies.The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is now considering whether to allow mitochondria replacement to be used in humans to prevent these diseases. Anne Stone traces evolution of tuberculosis and its hosts Anne Stone traces evolution of tuberculosis and its hosts Member Spotlight February 28, 2014 Obsessed with the way species live and evolve together, anthropological geneticist Anne Stone wants to know “How close are we to our closest relative?” and “Are we a reservoir for pathogens?” Is YODA wise enough to navigate a global public-private data project? Is YODA wise enough to navigate a global public-private data project? Capitol Connection February 19, 2014 Johnson & Johnson recently announced that its subsidiary, Janssen Research and Development, LLC, will partner with the Yale School of Medicine’s Open Data Access (YODA) project to share anonymized clinical trial data. The project seeks to provide “rigorous and objective evaluation of clinical trial data to ensure that patients and physicians possess all necessary information about a drug or device when making treatment decisions.” Janssen is the first company to partner with the project. First successful bone marrow transplant patient surviving and thriving at 60 In Depth February 10, 2014 Editor’s note: This interview is a side story for Thank Uncle Sam for life-saving bone marrow transplants, a look at how federal funding has advanced important discoveries. AAAS members selected 'most influential' by TheBestSchools.org Tuesday, January 28, 2014 Twenty-three AAAS members were amongst the scientists selected as "The 50 Most Influential Scientists in the World Today," by TheBestSchools.org, "a leading resource for prospective students seeking a college or university degree," according to Wayne Downs, the site's managing editor.  E. Donnall Thomas, known as the ‘father of bone marrow transplantation’ Thank Uncle Sam for life-saving bone marrow transplants In Depth February 10, 2014 Editor’s note: This is the first in a series of features highlighting how federal funding has advanced important discoveries. It’s only 60-year-old medical knowledge, but the ability to transfer healthy bone marrow—essentially an immune system—into a sick patient has saved tens of thousands of lives. AAAS Fellow Mahlon DeLong Interview with Breakthrough Prize-winning neurologist and AAAS Fellow Mahlon DeLong Tuesday, February 4, 2014 Emory University neurologist and AAAS Fellow Mahlon DeLong was one of six scientists awarded a $3 million Life Sciences Breakthrough Prize in December 2013. DeLong received the award for his work studying the brain circuits involved in Parkinson’s disease. AAAS MemberCentral blogger Summer Allen interviewed DeLong about his research, his reaction to winning the prize, and his advice for young scientists. New $1.5 million award for scientists working on big data New $1.5 million award for scientists working on big data Thursday, January 9, 2014 The Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation has announced an open call for applications for its brand-new Data-Driven Discovery Investigator competition. The foundation’s science program expects to offer about 15 awards this year to selected investigators at ~$1.5 million each ($200-300K/year for five years). Your chance to be featured in Science Tuesday, January 7, 2014 Answer this question: If you had 5 extra hours per week to devote to advocacy for science, how would you use that time? at http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/NextGen10mc Make sure to enter by the 14th February.  A selection of the best responses will be published in the April 4th issue of Science. See results from the last survey at http://scim.ag/NextGen9Results AAAS member Douglas Radford Shanklin dead at 83 Tuesday, December 10, 2013 AAAS member Douglas Radford Shanklin, A.B., M.D., F.R.S.M. passed way suddenly from cancer on November 12, 2013, in Washington D.C. He was 83.