VIDEO: AAAS Colloquium Series: The History of AAAS and Diversity Video January 22, 2016 Science imposes the discipline of having to find the best ideas among varied teams of people. This gives scientists and engineers the opportunity to be at the forefront of change. For diversity to be effective, the working environment must be right. For an individual, it takes conscious effort to overcome unconscious biases. For an organization like AAAS, it takes processes, procedures and a culture of acceptance. In this video, Shirley M. Malcom, head of Education and Human Resources Programs at AAAS, discusses AAAS and its history as a pioneer in cultural change. Science relaunches website Science relaunches website Tuesday, January 12, 2016 Sciencemag.org, AAAS's online flagship journal, Science, has a brand new look that incorporates many new features as well as existing online elements from the more recent journals in the Science family. The site rolled over on Tuesday, around 1:00 p.m. What's wrong with a white diversity officer? What's wrong with a white diversity officer? Driving Force January 12, 2016 Has Twitter blundered by appointing Jeffrey Siminoff, a white man, as its new diversity and inclusion officer? The social networking platform acknowledged minority underrepresentation in their U.S. workforce—2% African-American and 4% Latino—and hired Apple’s former diversity head (Siminoff) to succeed its former vice president of diversity (Janet Van Huysse, a white woman who served for six years).  Profile: AAAS Fellow Taft Broome Taft Broome takes hero journeys in engineering Member Spotlight January 6, 2016 Taft Broome remembers his first day as a field engineer. It was the summer of 1966 and he'd just graduated from Howard University. A half-hour after his fellow engineers left him alone in the job site trailer, a fleet of concrete trucks arrived and a driver demanded Broome instruct him where to pour the cement. With barely an hour of experience in the “field,” he was flustered. Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin II and STEM diversity Driving Force January 4, 2016 Institutions of higher education again await a ruling by the Supreme Court on whether, or how, race may be used in college admissions decisions. From reports of the arguments made to the Court last month in Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin II, we have learned that: Applications now open for minority science writers internship Applications now open for minority science writers internship Monday, December 14, 2015 The AAAS Pitts Family Foundation Minority Science Writers Internship is for undergraduates who are interested in journalism as a career and who want to learn about science writing. In addition to improving their skills, the program seeks to make a dent in the demographics of the profession: Although science is a global activity, the journalists who cover it don’t reflect that diversity. Networking for Successful International Research Collaborations (GS7) Podcast November 18, 2015 - 5:00pm - 6:00pm AAAS hosted a webinar on November 18th, with four female faculty and STEM researchers affiliated with minority-serving institutions, who were awarded travel grants to attend the gender summit 7 (GS7) in Germany in November, 2015. The awardees were invited as panelists during the webinar: Dr. Grazyna Badowski (University of Guam), Dr. Lymari Fuentes-Claudio (Universidad Metropolitana, Puerto Rico), Dr. Cynthia Waters (North Caroline A&T State University) and Dr. Amber Wise (Chicago State University). Time to try the ‘Rooney Rule’ in hiring STEM faculty? Driving Force December 2, 2015 In 2003, the National Football League instituted a policy that required teams to interview at least one minority candidate for every head-coaching vacancy. Named for current chairman of the Pittsburgh Steelers, Dan Rooney, it became known as the Rooney Rule. The tech industry, mired in monochromatic leadership, has been exhorted to adopt such a rule. I would extend that to all of STEM. Trashing 'diversity' (the word) Driving Force November 23, 2015 We have reached a tipping point in the use and interpretation of words that connote more than they denote. “Diversity” is the latest example. At a time when the Supreme Court is re-hearing the Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin case, The New York Times Magazine is calling out Hollywood and Silicon Valley for their invocation of the word without actions “to change a culture of overwhelming whiteness.”   Networking for Successful International Research Collaborations Podcast September 24, 2015 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm Female faculty/STEM researchers affiliated with minority-serving institutions, who attended the gender summit 6 (GS6) in Korea in August, 2015, discuss their networking efforts to find potential collaborators interested in developing jointly international research projects.