Networking for Successful International Research Collaborations (GS7) Podcast November 18, 2015 - 5:00pm - 6:00pm AAAS hosted a webinar on November 18th, with four female faculty and STEM researchers affiliated with minority-serving institutions, who were awarded travel grants to attend the gender summit 7 (GS7) in Germany in November, 2015. The awardees were invited as panelists during the webinar: Dr. Grazyna Badowski (University of Guam), Dr. Lymari Fuentes-Claudio (Universidad Metropolitana, Puerto Rico), Dr. Cynthia Waters (North Caroline A&T State University) and Dr. Amber Wise (Chicago State University). Trashing 'diversity' (the word) Driving Force November 23, 2015 We have reached a tipping point in the use and interpretation of words that connote more than they denote. “Diversity” is the latest example. At a time when the Supreme Court is re-hearing the Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin case, The New York Times Magazine is calling out Hollywood and Silicon Valley for their invocation of the word without actions “to change a culture of overwhelming whiteness.”   Networking for Successful International Research Collaborations Podcast September 24, 2015 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm Female faculty/STEM researchers affiliated with minority-serving institutions, who attended the gender summit 6 (GS6) in Korea in August, 2015, discuss their networking efforts to find potential collaborators interested in developing jointly international research projects. Driving Force AAAS blog Talking to foreign-born STEM faculty about diversity Driving Force September 22, 2015 I recently participated in a workshop hosted by PROMISE, the State of Maryland’s NSF Alliance for Graduate Education and the Professoriate (AGEP) program. Among the various presentations and small group discussions during the day, one stood out for its message—and its simplicity. I call it “the talk” because it resembles the “birds and the bees” conversation that many parents dread having. It's a talk about the biases we all have that may unconsciously lead to favoring certain students over. Sensitive, but necessary. Mentoring STEM women: The collaborator-mentee perspective in international research Podcast July 28, 2015 - 9:00am - 10:00am The program “Mentoring Women in International Research Collaborations in STEM (MWIRC),” recently hosted a webinar to showcase collaborator-mentee perspectives in international research. Highlighted are, Katherine Young, a biology grad student at New Mexico State University working in the lab of Kathryn A Hanley, and Audie K. Thompson, visiting professor in chemical engineering at Prairie View A&M University. Deploy data-driven messaging to swell the ranks of women in engineering Driving Force June 22, 2015 Any gathering of scientists or engineers will sooner or later gravitate to a discussion of data. At a time of heightened sensibility about the technical workforce and the persistent inequity in opportunities to join it, data take on an urgency of purpose—not just informing, but systematizing what we know, and potentially stigmatizing those supporting the status quo. Mentoring women in international research collaborations Podcast May 20, 2015 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm Panelists discuss their experiences in collaborating with researchers abroad while also mentoring students and helping them nurture similar relationships. They highlight the benefits of such international collaborations and also the challenges faced. Unconscious gender bias persists in science Driving Force April 10, 2015 A half-century ago, the renowned social anthropologist Margaret Mead wrote: Are core American values an advantage in the R&D workplace? Driving Force May 8, 2015 A recent editorial with the unfortunate title, “Why America’s Obsession with STEM Education is Dangerous,” nevertheless offers a cross-cultural perspective that has been missing from the national conversation on STEM as preparation for careers, a relentlessly innovative economy, and what is lost in the process. Two contradictions feed the backlash by some against STEM. One is an alleged imbalance of emphasis on STEM versus liberal-arts education—a false dichotomy if there ever was one. The other is the disconnect between U.S. preeminence in innovation, research and development on the one hand, and our students’ lagging international rankings on math, science, and reading tests on the other.  When scientists have to pay out of pocket to do their jobs When scientists have to pay out of pocket to do their jobs Driving Force April 6, 2015 Recent discussions on Twitter and science blogs show that scientists often pay for necessary professional expenses with their own money. This unfortunate expectation hurts students and weakens the pool of potential scientists by weeding out those with fewer resources.