VIDEO: Cutting Edge: Art & Science of Climate Change Video May 13, 2014 This video, “Cutting Edge: Art & Science of Climate Change,” features talks by two leading Arctic researchers and a panel discussion on the role artists and scientists can play in helping to communicate climate change to the public. "Cutting Edge" is a lecture series which presents diverging views on some of the most pressing issues humanity faces today. Andrew Fountain’s love affair with glaciers Andrew Fountain’s love affair with glaciers Member Spotlight December 17, 2014 When AAAS Fellow Andrew Fountain began studying glaciers more than 30 years ago, his research area was considered by many to be a bit of an oddity. These days that’s all changed. 5 Things About Me: Micropaleontologist/Paleoceanographer Ellen Thomas 5 Things About Me: Micropaleontologist/Paleoceanographer Ellen Thomas Member Spotlight December 12, 2014 Despite being told that women do not study geology, micropaleontologist Ellen Thomas did just that. She studies deep-sea fossils to reconstruct past periods of rapid global climate change—knowledge that can be used to predict how current and future climate change will impact marine ecosystems. Besides getting muddy in the field, Thomas enjoys music and books and even has a book recommendation for fellow AAAS members. AAAS BOO-LECULAR STENCIL - Dinosaurs AAAS Boo-lecular stencil - Dinosaurs Download October 30, 2014 IT'S PUMPKIN CARVING TIME! This Halloween, show your love for Science with a AAAS pumpkin carving stencil. Free to download now! Francesca Grifo is shaking up the EPA Francesca Grifo, an advocate for scientific integrity Member Spotlight November 25, 2014 Last year, AAAS Fellow Francesca Grifo became the first scientific integrity officer at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Tasked with a 2009 directive from the president, she is driving out the engrained political pressure that has seeped into the agency’s scientific endeavors, an issue spotlighted during the George W. Bush administration. The Union of Concerned Scientists alleged the president’s administration sought out and exploited uncertainties in climate change science, while altering EPA reports and excluding scientists from environmental policy decisions. Mark Hay is assisting coral survival [Ready for 2nd Edit] Mark Hay tracks coral health in Fijian waters Member Spotlight August 26, 2014 When people sense big trouble, they call for help. When the Pacific coral Acropora nasuta senses danger, it summons its own version of 911—an inch-long goby fish. The coral produces a compound that alerts the goby fish of the presence of poisonous seaweed that threatens the coral reefs. In response, the fish quickly gobble it up, thus protecting their own cozy reef home.  5 Things About Me: Paleontologist Rena Bonem 5 Things About Me: Paleontologist Rena Bonem Member Spotlight July 29, 2014 AAAS fellow and geology professor Rena Bonem’s love for fossils began in middle school. She’s also a certified scuba instructor and an advocate for saving coral reefs. When she’s not in the lab, classroom, or diving,  she competes in agility competitions with her rescue dogs.   Tim McClanahan works to save coral reefs using the language of science Tim McClanahan works to save coral reefs using the language of science Member Spotlight July 14, 2014 Sometimes scientific data can be used to tell both sides of a story. Sometimes it’s the very thing that bridges divided interests, offering real-world solutions that speak where words have failed. AAAS member Tim McClanahan was banking on that in 1994 when he invited a disgruntled group of traditional Kenyan fishermen to meet with him and marine resource managers to try to hash out new fisheries management practices. He was stepping into the middle of a fire storm. AAAS member Charles Swithinbank dies at 87 AAAS member Charles Swithinbank dies at 87 Thursday, June 26, 2014 AAAS member Charles Swithinbank, a glaciologist and polar specialist, died May 27, he was 87 years-old. Swithinbank's achievements at the poles spanned six decades and earned him the distinct honor of "having seen more of Antarctica than any living person," according to The American Polar Society's website. VIDEO: O. Roger Anderson: Radiolaria migrating from the tropics into Arctic waters Video May 13, 2014 This video features a talk by O. Roger Anderson, a professor of natural sciences at Columbia University Teachers College, and a senior research scientist in biology and paleoecology at Columbia University. Anderson's research areas include microbial ecology in the oceans, estuaries and Arctic tundra. He has published widely on radiolaria—microscopic protozoans that are now migrating from the tropics into Arctic waters—as the oceans warm.