Qualia

Understanding how collaborative efforts have shaped human evolution

December 5, 2011 | Author: AAAS member -- Padmini Rangamani, Postdoctoral fellow, UC Berkeley

Amongst all the species on earth, humans tend to have a larger degree of interaction among each other. Indeed, our social circle is divided into family, friends, colleagues, and even Facebook friends! All activities of our life, from dinner to papers, are collaborative efforts involving more than one member of our species. However, the ability to work together is not unique to human beings. Chimpanzees and other animals are known to work together in small groups too. So, is there a difference between how chimps collaborate and how humans collaborate?

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